Welcome to a new political era

The 2016 U.S. presidential election has just been concluded and the world saw Republican candidate Donald Trump win over rival and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, but the outcome shocked many because Clinton won the popular vote and Trump’s election-related statements within and outside social media garnered controversies. The world is now asking how Trump won. Did Facebook and Twitter help him win? The U.S. president-elect thinks so.

With social media having its role in the elections, it is now evolving from a communication tool to a news and information platform. Media analysts also ponder on the idea of predicting election results through social media after posts and tweets were used in forecasting results of both the European Union membership referendum in Great Britain and the U.S. election. The U.S. elections also cast a different light on social media because instead of enabling democratic discourse, people seemed to use it in spreading more negativity. Facebook also received a lot of flak on its handling of fake news appearing in its News Feed, but its CEO Mark Zuckerberg denies the company’s influence in American politics because he sees the website as a medium for sharing information.

The elections also have ramifications in journalism: there are reports of journalists fearing for their safety after receiving hate messages and threats over social media; journalism’s delivery system seems to be flawed given examples of how disjointed the current media landscape is; and journalistic standards collapse when networks begin choosing revenue and ratings over credibility and facts.

Here are other stories of interest:

Image: “American bald eagle” by Getty Images. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license

Ditto is a seasonal collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

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Adapting and adopting innovations in social media

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Twitter just announced that its user growth is still in a slump despite the introduction of its Moments feature. This seems to show that in the age where everything for a social media site could change in an instant, one of the keys to surviving the social media rat race is to offer innovation whenever possible.

Users could easily come and go, so social media sites offer new content and retool features as a way to make them stay. Whether it be through big moves, such as Facebook lining up new features ranging from indexing all user’s posts, testing out emoji reactions, instant articles, to rolling out a notification card system, or via small changes, like Twitter changing its star-shaped “favorite” button to a heart-shaped “like” button, these are decisions that site owners need to make to tip the scales in their favor.

Whether it’s for the upcoming elections or for the Internet’s biggest phenomenon, social media use plays a key role in how trends develop. With social media, site owners have an opportunity to showcase their flexibility and tech-savviness and a platform to discuss society’s biggest issues. It also powers the cycle where users adapt and adopt technology.

Here are the other stories that made it to our reading list:

Image: “50 Days of AWE” by AWSC. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Social media as news platforms

socialmediaJournalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran, under the pen name Nellie Bly, once said “energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.”

In celebration of Nellie Bly’s 151st birth anniversary last May 5, Google presented a Doodle tribute showing her milestones that left a legacy in the field of investigative journalism and in the world.

The field of journalism has changed drastically over the last two decades, particularly due to the Internet. The emergence of social media platforms will have an impact on the future of journalism and communication as the new source of news and as the vital tool for information dissemination. Examples of social media-influenced journalism in the last two weeks include:

 

  • In Philippine news, Mary Jane Veloso was granted a last-minute reprieve on her execution for the crime of drug trafficking in Indonesia. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, one of the top three newspapers in the country, however, published an article with an erroneous headline implying that Mary Jane had died. Here is a blog post reflecting on how this incident shows what is happening to journalism today.
  • The Baltimore riot has been the topic of major U.S. headlines because of the violence, the looting, and the city’s state of emergency. Here is the back story and timeline on Freddie Grey’s death, the investigation on six police officers involved, and the alleged police brutality that led to the riot.
  • Al Jazeera used their social media app unit AJ+ for real-time reporting on the Baltimore riots.

 

Here are other posts in our reading list:

Image: “Social Media” by Yoel Ben-Avraham (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Reinventing old habits for success

 

 

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Nobel laureate Günter Grass once said, “Writers know that sometimes things are there in the drawer for decades before they finally come out and you are capable of writing about them.”

Our selection for this issue takes up some of the reasons why some of our ideas could get stuck in what Grass referred to as “the drawer.”

And whether the fear of making mistakes, being too busy with work, or wasting too much time trying to get over that writer’s block is the one preventing you from opening the drawer, remember that writing is our second nature and the slumps will always come to an end at the right time, with the right actions.

Bear in mind that every obstacle presented is an opportunity to improve one’s self. So pick yourself up, grab your pen, get thinking, and prepare to face the day ahead with these articles guiding you along the way:

  • It’s hard to write when you think of yourself as “smart.” Why not change the frame? This article suggests that you think of yourself as “fascinating” instead.
  • You’ve probably read (or heard) about a popular Mashable article on “Why Zuck and other successful men wear the same thing every day”. Attention, women: you can wear the same thing every day too!
  • Grow as a leader by asking more questions instead of answering them as told through infographics.
  • Writing at a 5th grade level may actually be good. Find out how through the F-K Scores.
  • Wasting time can boost productivity and creativity. Here are things to do the next time you feel stuck at work.

Other stories of interest:

Image: “Motivational” by rajaisa (PicHost). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

On time management, emotional intelligence, and developing habits

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It’s the second quarter of the year. How are you doing with your goals and resolutions? Our picks for this week include a book review on how you can get yourself to develop habits that will help you with your goals, as well as readings on managing your schedule so you can leave work on time and prioritizing using psychological distance. Check out:

Other posts of interest:

Image: “time” by Sean MacEntee (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

On change, writing apps, overcoming creative block, pet peeves, and more

“Change is constant. Change is inevitable.” This applies to language, writing, and journalism too, especially in this age of technology. Perhaps at one point — when we were being sticklers for “proper” usage — we have corrected someone’s misuse of hopefully, literally, or enormity. However, people’s use of these words has changed, and we understand what they mean nonetheless, which is the point of language. Technology has also evolved, and it is changing how we write, edit, check for facts and plagiarism, and think about business. Here, we list recent stories on these changes, along with some creativity tips and fun reads.

 

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On Bloomberg and the Financial Times, AP and Homophobia, 2012 in Review and Mannying

December 8 to December 14, 2012

Last week, Twitter, Google and Facebook released year-end reviews using data from their users revealing world search trends and memes. Also, we saw Manny Pacquiao suffer a sixth-round knockout to Juan Manuel Marquez, and that image of Pacquiao echoed through social media and sparked a meme hours after the match. Meanwhile, the Associated Press banned the use of “homophobia” based on technicality, and NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg hinted on his interest to buy the Financial Times. Other stories in the lineup: Jack Reacher author Lee Child’s advice on creating suspense and using editing prompts.

Image credit: Twitter

Image credit: Twitter.

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On Scandinavian Roots, the Goodreads Choice Awards, the Publishing Person of the Year, the Business Side of News and Social Media Wars

December 1 to December 7, 2012

Last week had our inboxes and feeds oozing with stories on language, social media, journalism and books. First, a controversial theory that traces the English language’s roots to Scandinavia sparked debate among linguists. Next, J.K Rowling’s new (non-Harry Potter) book won this year’s Goodreads Choice Awards. Publishers Weekly, meanwhile, declared E.L. James as Publishing Person of the Year. Completing the news lineup: the end of The Daily, Book Week Scotland and the mystery book sculptor, and the launch of Socl and the new MySpace.

Image credit: "Day 168 - October 28, 2012" by Sonia Belviso on Flickr. Used under a CC BY 2.0 license.

Image credit: “Day 168 – October 28, 2012” by Sonia Belviso on Flickr. Used under a CC BY 2.0 license.

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On Election Day, Nate Silver, Macmillan Dictionary and NaNoWriMo Day 9

November 3 to November 9, 2012

This week: how journalists covered Election Day, Nate Silver and understanding big data, Macmillan’s move to stop its print edition and go digital-only in 2013 and Day 9 of the National Novel Writing Month.

Image credit: “Times Square, Election Night 2012” by Dan Nguyen on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 2.0).

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On Hilary Mantel, Newsweek Global, National Dictionary Day and Bad Words

October 13 to October 19, 2012

Two big announcements lead this week’s roundup. First, Hilary Mantel was named this year’s Man Booker Prize winner for Bring Up the Bodies, sequel to 2009’s Wolf Hall, which gave her her first Booker Prize. Second, Newsweek confirmed plans to go all-digital by 2013. Also in the lineup: tweets celebrating Mr. Webster’s birthday, a U.K. secretary’s 10-point grammar guide for his department staff, and bad habits that may hurt your grammar.

The first issue of News-Week (now Newsweek) dated February 17, 1933. Photo credit: News-Week magazine, Newsweek, Inc. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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