Sending love to all mothers

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Last May 10, the world celebrated Mother’s Day by giving thanks to all mothers: biological or adoptive, stepmothers and mothers-in-law, stay-at-home and working moms. Google’s Doodle for the occasion showcased various forms of motherly love ranging from a swan and her cygnet, a cheetah with her cub, to a child running to her mother for a hug.

People look up to their mothers for their selfless love, dedication for their families’ well-being, and wisdom. This issue is dedicated to resilient women everywhere. Here are selected articles for the queen of the house:

  • A mom’s job is surely tough. The challenges of motherhood come with opportunities to learn unique skills. One successful entrepreneur and mother listed the reasons why moms make for a great hire.
  • Working mothers have maternity leaves. But what if fathers can have more paternity leaves to help their wives get back on their feet?
  • There are also tips for the working mom-to-be in preparing for the birth of her baby while trying to sort things out in her job.

Other posts of interest include:

  • Fresh graduates will have to step up their game to land a good job. Here’s some advice to help them settle in as they join the job hunt. Also, here’s an insider’s view on some workplace secrets.
  • E-mails are an efficient communication alternative but they are also prone to misinterpretations. Look out for these five rude e-mails that you might be sending out every day.
  • Social media interaction can get tedious and monotonous over time if what you share or what your audience see stimulate insufficient interest. You might want to consider these seven ways to keep the conversation going.
  • How much of your posts on social media show your real life? On Instagram, college freshman Madison Holleran looked like she had it all: intelligence, beauty, and even athletic prowess. Behind the photos she shared, however, was a struggle holding her back from living a happy life.
  • Here’s a critique on Filipinos’ use of the word “Gayweather” as they reacted on the outcome of the Mayweather vs. Pacquiao boxing match.
Image: “Mother” by James Goodman (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye. 

Social media as news platforms

socialmediaJournalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran, under the pen name Nellie Bly, once said “energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.”

In celebration of Nellie Bly’s 151st birth anniversary last May 5, Google presented a Doodle tribute showing her milestones that left a legacy in the field of investigative journalism and in the world.

The field of journalism has changed drastically over the last two decades, particularly due to the Internet. The emergence of social media platforms will have an impact on the future of journalism and communication as the new source of news and as the vital tool for information dissemination. Examples of social media-influenced journalism in the last two weeks include:

 

  • In Philippine news, Mary Jane Veloso was granted a last-minute reprieve on her execution for the crime of drug trafficking in Indonesia. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, one of the top three newspapers in the country, however, published an article with an erroneous headline implying that Mary Jane had died. Here is a blog post reflecting on how this incident shows what is happening to journalism today.
  • The Baltimore riot has been the topic of major U.S. headlines because of the violence, the looting, and the city’s state of emergency. Here is the back story and timeline on Freddie Grey’s death, the investigation on six police officers involved, and the alleged police brutality that led to the riot.
  • Al Jazeera used their social media app unit AJ+ for real-time reporting on the Baltimore riots.

 

Here are other posts in our reading list:

Image: “Social Media” by Yoel Ben-Avraham (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Pencils, Pens and Writing from the Heart: The Beauty of Low-tech Blogging | Cat’s Eye Writer Blog | Judy Dunn | Blogger | Writer

Don’t forget old-school, pen-and-paper writing. Research shows writing by hand helps stimulate the brain. Judy Dunn shares simple, fun ideas on how writing by hand can make you “a more creative, interesting blogger.”

The research shows, and I have discovered it myself, that writing by hand engages the brain. The hand has a unique connection to the brain when we are generating and expressing ideas. Writing with a pen forces us to execute sequential strokes, while typing on a keyboard just requires selecting a whole letter by striking a key. And pictures of the brain have shown that sequential finger movements activated the region for thinking, language, creativity and memory.

via Pencils, Pens and Writing from the Heart: The Beauty of Low-tech Blogging | Cat’s Eye Writer Blog | Judy Dunn | Blogger | Writer.

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The 22 Rules of Storytelling, According to Pixar | io9.com

 

Emma Coats, storyboard artist at Pixar, shared a list of 22 rules for storytellers. Check out the link to read the full list on io9.com.

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

 

via The 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar.

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6 Ways to Never Run Out of Ideas | Rachelle Gardner

 

The key to never running out of writing ideas has more to do with overhauling your lifestyle than changing how you write. Most writers have all of the ideas they need. Here are six practices that will help you capture and develop your writing ideas.

 

1. Cut out the noise

2. Learn how to rest

3. Learn how to single task

4. Jot down incomplete ideas

5. Learn to thin writing ideas

6. Write to an idea

 

Click on the link below to read the full article and know more about each item in the list.

via 6 Ways to Never Run Out of Ideas | Rachelle Gardner.

Harvesting Questions for Content Ideas | Search Engine Watch

If you’ve noticed, we’re uploading posters of writing prompts weekly to help our friends recover from a temporary writer’s block or simply to give them something to write about if they’re in between assignments. SearchEngineWatch.com shares another way to find ideas to write about: Mine for frequently asked questions in Q&A sites.

 

 

Theres no denying it: coming up with solid topic ideas for content and linkable assets on a consistent basis is hard work. Using keyword tools to unearth keyword ideas that are proven to drive traffic is one effective and time-honored method of topic discovery. Another is using popular questions to fuel content ideation.

via Harvesting Questions for Content Ideas – Search Engine Watch #SEW.

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What I’ve learned from writing 2,000 blog posts | Econsultancy

For those of you who are just starting or planning to build a blog, here’s advice from Econsultancy.com. (Some of them paraphrased.)

Don’t try to be a jack of all trades

Learn from the experts

Don’t rely on spellcheck

Keep it simple

Avoid jargon

Headlines are key

Internal linking is important

Create readable content

Original content works best

Link to other bloggers

Do lots of reading

Do not feed the trolls

Listen to feedback

Don’t blog [just] for the sake of it

It’s about quality not quantity

Social media is important

Analytics is important

Timing is everything

Comment on your own posts

Timesaving tools and apps may make your job easier

What other tips would you like to share?

via What Ive learned from writing 2,000 blog posts | Econsultancy.

12 unforgivable writing mistakes | Articles

We all make mistakes, but there are some that writers should never make.

Here’s Jacqui MacKenzie’s list of unforgivable mistakes:

1. Fewer versus less

2. Affect versus effect

3. Pronoun/antecedent disagreement

4. Misspellings

5. It’s versus its

6. Misuse of the semicolon

7. Alot versus a lot

8. Inconsistency

9. Poorly cited stats and quotes

10. Then versus than

11. Lose versus Loose

12. Stolen content

Click on the link to read more on why each mistake is unforgivable and how to avoid them and maintain your credibility.

via 12 unforgivable writing mistakes | Articles.

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