Filipinos’ electoral engagement as seen on social media

2016Elections

Social media seemed to have played a distinct role in the recent Philippine national elections. The run-up to the May 9 polls was marked by high engagement as Filipinos typed with vigor and/or fury, voicing out their opinions and support for their candidates through the means of social networking sites. This led to the Philippines landing a spot in Twitter’s “Top Social Media Countries in the World.”

Meanwhile, teenagers, comprising most of the social media users’ population, have been a challenging audience for some sectors, especially those who perceive the youth as having low awareness or interest in details about history and Philippine politics. As the recent electoral period has seen, however, using social media as a catalyst can become a game changer for campaigns to consider in capturing the youth’s attention for future elections.

Here are more stories of interest:

  • Peabody Awards and Facebook team up for the launch of the Futures of Media Award, which is described as the “new prize honoring excellence and innovation in digital storytelling.”
  • Studies from Pew Research Center and Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Lab explore how the Internet affects what and how we read.
  • The New York Times, along with Associated Press, has decided to stop capitalizing the word “internet.”
  • Garner’s Modern American Usage becomes Garner’s Modern English Usage as the new edition integrates an “inclusive approach to World English.”
  • Typography, believe it or not, can have life or death consequences, especially on road signs.
  • For writers, The Atlantic author Ian Bogost writes a review about Freewrite, a smart typewriter made for writers who don’t want distractions from the Internet.
  • Twitter recently made changes within its interface, such as making usernames, photos, and videos no longer part of the 140-character limit and providing the option to retweet one’s own tweets and replies.
  • Facebook’s “Trending Topics” feature is once again under controversy when leaked guidelines allegedly show the involvement of editors, instead of algorithms, in selecting news for said feature.
  • Jeff Jarvis, in a piece for the annual Tinius Trust report titled “Death to the Mass,” explains why “media must rebuild its business around relevance and value, not volume,” and how the Internet changed the old mass-media business model.
  • Scammers have been lurking in the Internet for their next victims, so let this be a call to protect ourselves while navigating the social networking sites safely.
  • Social media can also be a tool in saving lives as demonstrated during the tragic landslide in Aranayake, Sri Lanka last May 19.
  • Different cultures define the concept of deadlines depending on how people perceive time.
  • Our work environment can have a negative effect on our mental health, according to the Mental Resilience Survey.
  • Here is an infographic with seven ways on how to stay calm under pressure.
  • A 10-minute mind cleansing routine is always handy for a boost in clarity and creativity.
Image: “The 2016 Elections” by Angelo Lopez (AAEC). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.
Advertisements

Social media as news platforms

socialmediaJournalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran, under the pen name Nellie Bly, once said “energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.”

In celebration of Nellie Bly’s 151st birth anniversary last May 5, Google presented a Doodle tribute showing her milestones that left a legacy in the field of investigative journalism and in the world.

The field of journalism has changed drastically over the last two decades, particularly due to the Internet. The emergence of social media platforms will have an impact on the future of journalism and communication as the new source of news and as the vital tool for information dissemination. Examples of social media-influenced journalism in the last two weeks include:

 

  • In Philippine news, Mary Jane Veloso was granted a last-minute reprieve on her execution for the crime of drug trafficking in Indonesia. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, one of the top three newspapers in the country, however, published an article with an erroneous headline implying that Mary Jane had died. Here is a blog post reflecting on how this incident shows what is happening to journalism today.
  • The Baltimore riot has been the topic of major U.S. headlines because of the violence, the looting, and the city’s state of emergency. Here is the back story and timeline on Freddie Grey’s death, the investigation on six police officers involved, and the alleged police brutality that led to the riot.
  • Al Jazeera used their social media app unit AJ+ for real-time reporting on the Baltimore riots.

 

Here are other posts in our reading list:

Image: “Social Media” by Yoel Ben-Avraham (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Reinventing old habits for success

 

 

1589729 (1)

Nobel laureate Günter Grass once said, “Writers know that sometimes things are there in the drawer for decades before they finally come out and you are capable of writing about them.”

Our selection for this issue takes up some of the reasons why some of our ideas could get stuck in what Grass referred to as “the drawer.”

And whether the fear of making mistakes, being too busy with work, or wasting too much time trying to get over that writer’s block is the one preventing you from opening the drawer, remember that writing is our second nature and the slumps will always come to an end at the right time, with the right actions.

Bear in mind that every obstacle presented is an opportunity to improve one’s self. So pick yourself up, grab your pen, get thinking, and prepare to face the day ahead with these articles guiding you along the way:

  • It’s hard to write when you think of yourself as “smart.” Why not change the frame? This article suggests that you think of yourself as “fascinating” instead.
  • You’ve probably read (or heard) about a popular Mashable article on “Why Zuck and other successful men wear the same thing every day”. Attention, women: you can wear the same thing every day too!
  • Grow as a leader by asking more questions instead of answering them as told through infographics.
  • Writing at a 5th grade level may actually be good. Find out how through the F-K Scores.
  • Wasting time can boost productivity and creativity. Here are things to do the next time you feel stuck at work.

Other stories of interest:

Image: “Motivational” by rajaisa (PicHost). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

The Green Water Blog: 15 Common Mistakes Found in Query Letters

Mike Wells, author and creative writing teacher at Oxford, shares 15 mistakes in queries. We’ve posted the first five here; click on the link below to read the complete post.

If you decide to go the traditional publishing route with one or more of your books, you will need to send out query letters to agents and publishing house editors.  Here are 15 common mistakes that will very likely cause your query to end up in the trash.

1.  Query contains typos, misspellings, grammatical and punctuation mistakes.

2.  Query lacks basic information.

3.  Query contains irrelevant information.

4.  Query fails to state genre of book.

5.  Query fails to differentiate your book from other similar-sounding books.

 

via The Green Water Blog: 15 Common Mistakes Found in Query Letters.

Ten Commandments for Editing Someone’s Work | Nathan Bransford, Author

 

Nathan Bransford, author of the Jacob Wonderbar novels and social media manager at CNET, shares 10 tips on editing someone’s work. Here’s an excerpt of the 10 “commandments.” Click on the link below for the full article.

 

1. Remember that it’s not your book.

2. Find out what the author is looking for before you start editing.

3. You’re not doing anyone favors by being too nice.

4. You’re not doing anyone favors by being a jerk either.

5. Pointing out problem areas is far more helpful than offering solutions.

6.  Try to figure out why something isn’t working for you – There will be times where something about a scene just doesn’t seem right.

7. Just make it work – It’s about making it a good story, not about writing a paper on it.

8. Don’t overdo it.

9. Remember that personal taste is personal.

10. Be Positive – Your job as an editor is not to crush someone’s spirit, even if you think their manuscript sucks.

 

via Ten Commandments for Editing Someone’s Work | Nathan Bransford, Author.

 

Sheryl Sandberg Leaves Work at 5:30. Why Cant You? | Inc.com

 

I walk out of this office every day at 5:30 so Im home for dinner with my kids at 6:00, and interestingly, Ive been doing that since I had kids. I did that when I was at Google, I did that here, and I would say its not until the last year, two years, that Im brave enough to talk about it publicly. Now I certainly wouldnt lie, but I wasnt running around giving speeches on it.

 

via Sheryl Sandberg Leaves Work at 5:30. Why Cant You? | Inc.com.

 

Tip of the week: Setting editing expectations | Copyediting.com

Before you take on any copyediting project, make sure expectations are well defined so they can be managed.

You need to tell your client or boss right away if you can’t do the expected edit in the time you’ve been given. This situation can be hard for non-editors to understand. When I run into this situation, I demonstrate the difference between what the manuscript needs and what I can do with samples and lists.

via Tip of the week: Setting editing expectations | Copyediting.com.

Six Tips for Ergonomic PDF Proofreading – Louise Harnby | Proofreader

Proofing PDFs? Lousie Harnby shares six tips to maximize available tools and make onscreen proofing a breeze. Click on the link below for the full article.

There are aspects of onscreen work that are speedier – searching for and implementing global changes, for example – while moving between the various mark-up tools is not as quick as using a hand and pen. There are, however, things you can do to compensate and make your onscreen experience more effective.

via Six Tips for Ergonomic PDF Proofreading – Louise Harnby | Proofreader.