On time management, emotional intelligence, and developing habits

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It’s the second quarter of the year. How are you doing with your goals and resolutions? Our picks for this week include a book review on how you can get yourself to develop habits that will help you with your goals, as well as readings on managing your schedule so you can leave work on time and prioritizing using psychological distance. Check out:

Other posts of interest:

Image: “time” by Sean MacEntee (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

On change, writing apps, overcoming creative block, pet peeves, and more

“Change is constant. Change is inevitable.” This applies to language, writing, and journalism too, especially in this age of technology. Perhaps at one point — when we were being sticklers for “proper” usage — we have corrected someone’s misuse of hopefully, literally, or enormity. However, people’s use of these words has changed, and we understand what they mean nonetheless, which is the point of language. Technology has also evolved, and it is changing how we write, edit, check for facts and plagiarism, and think about business. Here, we list recent stories on these changes, along with some creativity tips and fun reads.

 

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On the iPad Mini, the Obama-Romney Debates, Young Readers and the Benefits of Tweeting

October 20 to October 25, 2012

The iPad proved to be a hit for journalists and now Apple is stepping into the smaller-tablet market as it unveiled the new iPad Mini last Tuesday. Those who attended the event excitedly tried the new tab, but soon concerns about its pricing surfaced. Also on Tuesday, Pew released a study on younger Americans’ reading habits finding that most young people still read and go to libraries.

Image credit: “Electronic Book” by Timo Noko on Flickr. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.

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Summer Reading Flowchart: What Should You Read On Your Break? | Teach.com


Summer Reading Flowchart

Via Teach.com and USC Rossier Online

To help encourage high school students to find a book of their choice, we’ve compiled a list of 101 books to kick off your learners’ summer reading. Interested in finding fiction vs. non-fiction books? Would you like to find classical or contemporary fiction? Intrigued by survival books? Tales of war? We have them all and many more to choose from! Follow our chart of top picks and peruse the different categories until you find something that’s a perfect fit!

via Summer Reading Flowchart: What Should You Read On Your Break? | Teach.com.

h/t Galley Cat on Twitter

67 Books: The Printable List | GeekDad | Wired.com

Putting up a reading list for kids below 10? Download and print GeekDad’s list.

Here is a list that you can highlight, download, pass on to your friends and take with you to your local library. All the while knowing your children are getting the geeky goodness they deserve. Enjoy and Happy Reading!

via 67 Books: The Printable List | GeekDad | Wired.com.

Raising a Reader | Reader’s Digest

“Decades of research demonstrate that enjoying reading and reading well are the biggest factors in a child’s school success.” Reader’s Digest offers five tips for parents who want to help their children become good readers.

1. Good readers start out ahead.

2. Good readers have better vocabularies.

3. Good readers preview and summarize. 

4. Good readers picture a story in the mind.

5. Good readers connect to what they’re reading.

 

via Raising a Reader | Reader’s Digest.