Filipinos’ electoral engagement as seen on social media

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Social media seemed to have played a distinct role in the recent Philippine national elections. The run-up to the May 9 polls was marked by high engagement as Filipinos typed with vigor and/or fury, voicing out their opinions and support for their candidates through the means of social networking sites. This led to the Philippines landing a spot in Twitter’s “Top Social Media Countries in the World.”

Meanwhile, teenagers, comprising most of the social media users’ population, have been a challenging audience for some sectors, especially those who perceive the youth as having low awareness or interest in details about history and Philippine politics. As the recent electoral period has seen, however, using social media as a catalyst can become a game changer for campaigns to consider in capturing the youth’s attention for future elections.

Here are more stories of interest:

  • Peabody Awards and Facebook team up for the launch of the Futures of Media Award, which is described as the “new prize honoring excellence and innovation in digital storytelling.”
  • Studies from Pew Research Center and Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Lab explore how the Internet affects what and how we read.
  • The New York Times, along with Associated Press, has decided to stop capitalizing the word “internet.”
  • Garner’s Modern American Usage becomes Garner’s Modern English Usage as the new edition integrates an “inclusive approach to World English.”
  • Typography, believe it or not, can have life or death consequences, especially on road signs.
  • For writers, The Atlantic author Ian Bogost writes a review about Freewrite, a smart typewriter made for writers who don’t want distractions from the Internet.
  • Twitter recently made changes within its interface, such as making usernames, photos, and videos no longer part of the 140-character limit and providing the option to retweet one’s own tweets and replies.
  • Facebook’s “Trending Topics” feature is once again under controversy when leaked guidelines allegedly show the involvement of editors, instead of algorithms, in selecting news for said feature.
  • Jeff Jarvis, in a piece for the annual Tinius Trust report titled “Death to the Mass,” explains why “media must rebuild its business around relevance and value, not volume,” and how the Internet changed the old mass-media business model.
  • Scammers have been lurking in the Internet for their next victims, so let this be a call to protect ourselves while navigating the social networking sites safely.
  • Social media can also be a tool in saving lives as demonstrated during the tragic landslide in Aranayake, Sri Lanka last May 19.
  • Different cultures define the concept of deadlines depending on how people perceive time.
  • Our work environment can have a negative effect on our mental health, according to the Mental Resilience Survey.
  • Here is an infographic with seven ways on how to stay calm under pressure.
  • A 10-minute mind cleansing routine is always handy for a boost in clarity and creativity.
Image: “The 2016 Elections” by Angelo Lopez (AAEC). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.
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Adapting and adopting innovations in social media

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Twitter just announced that its user growth is still in a slump despite the introduction of its Moments feature. This seems to show that in the age where everything for a social media site could change in an instant, one of the keys to surviving the social media rat race is to offer innovation whenever possible.

Users could easily come and go, so social media sites offer new content and retool features as a way to make them stay. Whether it be through big moves, such as Facebook lining up new features ranging from indexing all user’s posts, testing out emoji reactions, instant articles, to rolling out a notification card system, or via small changes, like Twitter changing its star-shaped “favorite” button to a heart-shaped “like” button, these are decisions that site owners need to make to tip the scales in their favor.

Whether it’s for the upcoming elections or for the Internet’s biggest phenomenon, social media use plays a key role in how trends develop. With social media, site owners have an opportunity to showcase their flexibility and tech-savviness and a platform to discuss society’s biggest issues. It also powers the cycle where users adapt and adopt technology.

Here are the other stories that made it to our reading list:

Image: “50 Days of AWE” by AWSC. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Social media as news platforms

socialmediaJournalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran, under the pen name Nellie Bly, once said “energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.”

In celebration of Nellie Bly’s 151st birth anniversary last May 5, Google presented a Doodle tribute showing her milestones that left a legacy in the field of investigative journalism and in the world.

The field of journalism has changed drastically over the last two decades, particularly due to the Internet. The emergence of social media platforms will have an impact on the future of journalism and communication as the new source of news and as the vital tool for information dissemination. Examples of social media-influenced journalism in the last two weeks include:

 

  • In Philippine news, Mary Jane Veloso was granted a last-minute reprieve on her execution for the crime of drug trafficking in Indonesia. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, one of the top three newspapers in the country, however, published an article with an erroneous headline implying that Mary Jane had died. Here is a blog post reflecting on how this incident shows what is happening to journalism today.
  • The Baltimore riot has been the topic of major U.S. headlines because of the violence, the looting, and the city’s state of emergency. Here is the back story and timeline on Freddie Grey’s death, the investigation on six police officers involved, and the alleged police brutality that led to the riot.
  • Al Jazeera used their social media app unit AJ+ for real-time reporting on the Baltimore riots.

 

Here are other posts in our reading list:

Image: “Social Media” by Yoel Ben-Avraham (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Technology and changes in the workplace

Less than a year since Samsung’s Note 3 and Apple’s iPhone 5 were released, we now have the Note 4 and the iPhone 6. Technology is rapidly changing; so is almost everything around us. In this post, we share some readings about changes in the work environment, their impact, and what possibly lies ahead.

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On change, writing apps, overcoming creative block, pet peeves, and more

“Change is constant. Change is inevitable.” This applies to language, writing, and journalism too, especially in this age of technology. Perhaps at one point — when we were being sticklers for “proper” usage — we have corrected someone’s misuse of hopefully, literally, or enormity. However, people’s use of these words has changed, and we understand what they mean nonetheless, which is the point of language. Technology has also evolved, and it is changing how we write, edit, check for facts and plagiarism, and think about business. Here, we list recent stories on these changes, along with some creativity tips and fun reads.

 

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“Tech” and other skills media folks need in the age of the Web

Journalists, editors, and writers may not need to know how to make software or assemble and maintain hardware, but the rise of the Internet and related technology has made it necessary for media folk to “get into tech.”  There’s much to learn about distribution platforms as well as modes of content-sharing and content ownership brought about by the Web that was not anticipated by the old journalism or mass communication curricula; there may be a bit of catching-up to do. This is not to say, though, that “classic” editorial skills are out the window.  Specialized skills remain valued and valuable through time. Like other professionals, those in media just need to understand and manage changes in the world and career environment that are taking place.

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What else can we do with our strengths?

March 1 to March 14

 

As technology continues to change the media, publishing, and communications landscapes, the importance of human editors is being challenged. The automation of the editing process, the pressure to break stories first, and the underselling of freelancers threaten our value to the organizations and the industries we serve.

We know that being an editor is more than just correcting grammar, spelling, and punctuation. But how do we show that to organizations and to consumers of information? In this issue of Ditto, we explore other ways we can use our editorial skills.

 

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On Hilary Mantel, Newsweek Global, National Dictionary Day and Bad Words

October 13 to October 19, 2012

Two big announcements lead this week’s roundup. First, Hilary Mantel was named this year’s Man Booker Prize winner for Bring Up the Bodies, sequel to 2009’s Wolf Hall, which gave her her first Booker Prize. Second, Newsweek confirmed plans to go all-digital by 2013. Also in the lineup: tweets celebrating Mr. Webster’s birthday, a U.K. secretary’s 10-point grammar guide for his department staff, and bad habits that may hurt your grammar.

The first issue of News-Week (now Newsweek) dated February 17, 1933. Photo credit: News-Week magazine, Newsweek, Inc. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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Why the Oregon Daily Emerald is transforming what it means to be a college newspaper | Nieman Journalism Lab

“We’re shifting to this idea of what does the reader want, not what do we think the reader needs, which has been the journalism philosophy for years.”

– Andy Rossback, Emerald Editor-in-Chief

via Why the Oregon Daily Emerald is transforming what it means to be a college newspaper » Nieman Journalism Lab.

Image via original article.

The Verge interview: David Carr on curation, crowdsourcing, and the future of journalism | The Verge

The New York Times columnist David Carr talks about the Curator’s Code, WikiLeaks, NYT’s paywall and where journalism is heading.

YOU CAN DEPEND ON THE WISDOM OF CROWDS TO DO SO, TO SET UP YOUR MEDIA STREAMS — BUT IN MY EXPERIENCE? CROWDS: NOT THAT WISE.

via The Verge interview: David Carr on curation, crowdsourcing, and the future of journalism | The Verge.