Filipinos’ electoral engagement as seen on social media

2016Elections

Social media seemed to have played a distinct role in the recent Philippine national elections. The run-up to the May 9 polls was marked by high engagement as Filipinos typed with vigor and/or fury, voicing out their opinions and support for their candidates through the means of social networking sites. This led to the Philippines landing a spot in Twitter’s “Top Social Media Countries in the World.”

Meanwhile, teenagers, comprising most of the social media users’ population, have been a challenging audience for some sectors, especially those who perceive the youth as having low awareness or interest in details about history and Philippine politics. As the recent electoral period has seen, however, using social media as a catalyst can become a game changer for campaigns to consider in capturing the youth’s attention for future elections.

Here are more stories of interest:

  • Peabody Awards and Facebook team up for the launch of the Futures of Media Award, which is described as the “new prize honoring excellence and innovation in digital storytelling.”
  • Studies from Pew Research Center and Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Lab explore how the Internet affects what and how we read.
  • The New York Times, along with Associated Press, has decided to stop capitalizing the word “internet.”
  • Garner’s Modern American Usage becomes Garner’s Modern English Usage as the new edition integrates an “inclusive approach to World English.”
  • Typography, believe it or not, can have life or death consequences, especially on road signs.
  • For writers, The Atlantic author Ian Bogost writes a review about Freewrite, a smart typewriter made for writers who don’t want distractions from the Internet.
  • Twitter recently made changes within its interface, such as making usernames, photos, and videos no longer part of the 140-character limit and providing the option to retweet one’s own tweets and replies.
  • Facebook’s “Trending Topics” feature is once again under controversy when leaked guidelines allegedly show the involvement of editors, instead of algorithms, in selecting news for said feature.
  • Jeff Jarvis, in a piece for the annual Tinius Trust report titled “Death to the Mass,” explains why “media must rebuild its business around relevance and value, not volume,” and how the Internet changed the old mass-media business model.
  • Scammers have been lurking in the Internet for their next victims, so let this be a call to protect ourselves while navigating the social networking sites safely.
  • Social media can also be a tool in saving lives as demonstrated during the tragic landslide in Aranayake, Sri Lanka last May 19.
  • Different cultures define the concept of deadlines depending on how people perceive time.
  • Our work environment can have a negative effect on our mental health, according to the Mental Resilience Survey.
  • Here is an infographic with seven ways on how to stay calm under pressure.
  • A 10-minute mind cleansing routine is always handy for a boost in clarity and creativity.
Image: “The 2016 Elections” by Angelo Lopez (AAEC). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.
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Discipline for improvement, teamwork for innovation

Seemingly taking a cue from competitive sports – as the 2014 Football World Cup opened in Brazil early this week — our favorite readings this issue explore the subjects of discipline for improvement and teamwork for innovation, which are key result areas in today’s competitive and hectic workplace. Discipline, said legendary graphic designer Massimo Vignelli, enables self-improvement and allows us to “offer the best of ourselves to everything around us, including every project on which we work.”  Teamwork through the combination of team members’ “separate splices of genius” can result in a “single work of collective genius” that marks “truly innovative” groups.

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On Maya Angelou, success, and other things to learn

Phenomenal author, poet, activist, and actress Dr. Maya Angelou died at 86 on May 28. Her life and lessons inspired people, from writers and activists to hip-hop artists and scientists, to be their best selves. Social media users paid tribute by sharing Dr. Angelou’s inspiring words, one of them is on lifelong learning: “I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn.” So here are some pieces from the past two weeks to help us keep learning:

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A style tip, a juice box, a writing bot and more

March 15 to March 28

 

 

The elements in our list above provide the main theme of reading picks in this, our fourth issue.  As motley as they are, the style update to a much-referenced newspaper stylebook, the markings on boxes of a certain orange juice brand, and a computer program called Quakebot that “wrote” and sent news of an earthquake to news desks in Los Angeles recently, seem to be heralding changes — in word usage, people’s attitudes to grammar, and the business and practice of journalism. Read on:

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On @YourInAmerica, the Leveson Inquiry, Recent Findings and the Love English Awards 2012

November 24 to November 30, 2012

The week was filled with language, publishing, social media and journalism stories, including a Twitter-bot that shames those who actually mess up while trying to tell other people to learn proper English, reactions on the report on “the culture, practices and ethics of the press,” a deal that would sell McGraw-Hill’s education business to a private equity firm and the second year of Macmillan’s Love English Awards.

 

Image credit: "Love English" by Adrian Claudio.

Image credit: “Love English” by Adrian Claudio.

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On Election Day, Nate Silver, Macmillan Dictionary and NaNoWriMo Day 9

November 3 to November 9, 2012

This week: how journalists covered Election Day, Nate Silver and understanding big data, Macmillan’s move to stop its print edition and go digital-only in 2013 and Day 9 of the National Novel Writing Month.

Image credit: “Times Square, Election Night 2012” by Dan Nguyen on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 2.0).

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On NaNoWriMo, Random Penguin, Sandy and “Trick or Treat!”

October 27 to November 1, 2012

After Sandy, the U.S. East Coast starts to recover and people are trying to go back to their daily lives. Amidst the storm, Penguin and Random House announced their plans to merge and gain the upper hand against competitors. Meanwhile, the challenge to write a novel in 30 days begins today. Also in the lineup: the etymology of “trick or treat,” the “scariest” writing errors and social media zombies.

Image from Kameron Hurley (‏@KameronHurley). (https://twitter.com/KameronHurley/status/261515677901393921/photo/1)

Image from Kameron Hurley (‏@KameronHurley).

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On the iPad Mini, the Obama-Romney Debates, Young Readers and the Benefits of Tweeting

October 20 to October 25, 2012

The iPad proved to be a hit for journalists and now Apple is stepping into the smaller-tablet market as it unveiled the new iPad Mini last Tuesday. Those who attended the event excitedly tried the new tab, but soon concerns about its pricing surfaced. Also on Tuesday, Pew released a study on younger Americans’ reading habits finding that most young people still read and go to libraries.

Image credit: “Electronic Book” by Timo Noko on Flickr. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.

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Style and grammar, or why lots of things aren’t ‘wrong’ | Grammar Monkeys | Wichita Eagle Blogs

Here’s a post from Grammar Monkeys explaining the difference between grammar and style. In some cases, errors that people point out as grammar errors are actually usage errors or style issues.

Style and grammar, or why lots of things aren’t ‘wrong’ | Grammar Monkeys | Wichita Eagle Blogs.

Image via original post.