trump

Welcome to a new political era

The 2016 U.S. presidential election has just been concluded and the world saw Republican candidate Donald Trump win over rival and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, but the outcome shocked many because Clinton won the popular vote and Trump’s election-related statements within and outside social media garnered controversies. The world is now asking how Trump won. Did Facebook and Twitter help him win? The U.S. president-elect thinks so.

With social media having its role in the elections, it is now evolving from a communication tool to a news and information platform. Media analysts also ponder on the idea of predicting election results through social media after posts and tweets were used in forecasting results of both the European Union membership referendum in Great Britain and the U.S. election. The U.S. elections also cast a different light on social media because instead of enabling democratic discourse, people seemed to use it in spreading more negativity. Facebook also received a lot of flak on its handling of fake news appearing in its News Feed, but its CEO Mark Zuckerberg denies the company’s influence in American politics because he sees the website as a medium for sharing information.

The elections also have ramifications in journalism: there are reports of journalists fearing for their safety after receiving hate messages and threats over social media; journalism’s delivery system seems to be flawed given examples of how disjointed the current media landscape is; and journalistic standards collapse when networks begin choosing revenue and ratings over credibility and facts.

Here are other stories of interest:

Image: “American bald eagle” by Getty Images. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license

Ditto is a seasonal collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

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Misinformation in Social Media

 

In this day and age when information can be easily shared with a click, perhaps everyone has used social media to disseminate information. But not everything about this is positive because not all information shared is true and verified. The ability to instantly publish and share content to your readers has enabled trolls and hoax news to thrive; worse, once you click “share” and your content has wrong details, every second or minute that it stays uncorrected all the more perpetuates misinformation.

 

In response, media and Web-supporting companies such as Google have implemented measures to ensure that the content released through them is verified and fact-checked, while others have begun to educate readers, teaching them to choose the right sources of information and to fact-check the stories on their own because the cycle of misinformation will only end if the media providers and platforms, as well as the audience, all work together.

 

Here are our stories for this issue:

 

  • Facebook launches Workplace, made it’s news feed work better for users with slow network connections, and now offers free online courses for journalists who would like to use the social media platform for their media work.
  • Twitter announces that it will be discontinuing Vine in the coming months.
  • Black Mirror writer Charlie Brooker tells how his experience with hatred on social media inspired this season’s finale, “Hated in the Nation.”
  • University of Connecticut associate professor Dave D’Allesio discusses media bias and the US presidential elections.
  • Poynter presents a brief history of data journalism.
  • The Pulitzer Prize Board announces a few changes for the annual contest. Both print and online magazines can now submit an entry in every Pulitzer category.
  • Paul Beatty takes home this year’s Man Booker prize, the first US author to do so.
  • Websites these days use lighter and thinner fonts, but these fonts make it difficult for the elderly and the visually impaired to read the websites.
  • Artists around the world celebrate Inktober by sharing one ink drawing or doodle each day for the whole month of October.
  • The “information literacy” framework used by librarians offers media practitioners and audience members a “more meaningful way to engage with and manage information” especially in the current milieu where information is constantly repackaged and repurposed, especially via social media.
  • Research shows that the decline of traditional media platforms and the reliance on a single platform (like a social media one) for news – that is mixed with gossip –  encourages clustering of like-minded individuals and may contribute to weakening the setting up of a “common public agenda” that can lead to destabilizing behavior in politics as well as in markets.
  • An investigative reporter who probed into the identity of Elena Ferrante, author of the best-selling multivolume Neapolitan novels, discusses his motivations for revealing the real identity of Ferrante, who has been likened to authors like Thomas Pynchon for shunning the public eye.

 

Image: “Confusion” by Getty Images. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license

Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Public news consumption and journalistic objectivity and accountability in the social media era

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The values of both traditional and new media seem to have merged as the popularity of social media as news platforms has significantly grown in recent years. Public news consumption also seems to be shifting away from traditional to digital media. Journalists should keep up with the changing media landscape and not take journalistic principles like objectivity and accountability to the public for granted now that news and information can be accessed with just one click.

As journalists increasingly use social media in their work, it seems they need to be reminded of two important principles in their line of work — objectivity and accountability to the public — amid developments like dubious sources and trend lists as reported below:

  • Columbia Journalism Review revealed how phony news sites trick journalists and how the news industry seems to consider errors related to reporters’ use of questionable information as a “forgiveable sin.”
  • NYU technology researcher Danah Boyd said that recent controversies regarding Facebook’s “Trending Topics” go beyond the issue of neutrality. She asserted that Facebook must be accountable to the public because it is among “powerful” institutions that need checks and balances in the interest of the responsible functioning of society.

 

Here are other interesting posts in our reading list:

 

  • Facebook announced that it has developed a new AI called “DeepText” that can understand textual content with “near-human accuracy.”
  • Philippine President-elect Rodrigo Duterte has expressed his opinion on how he would address the problem of media killings in the country in a recent press conference. He said that the journalists who are corrupt and who accept bribes were “legitimate targets for assassination.” Meanwhile, journalists’ groups in the Philippines have slammed Duterte’s statement about the problem of media killing in the country.
  • Facebook has taken down reporter Ed Lingao’s post against former President Marcos’ burial at the “Libingan ng mga Bayani,” citing violation of “Facebook community standards.” Some Facebook users have called out the site for violating press freedom and reposted Lingao’s article on their timelines.
  • The UK’s National Environment Research Council (NERC) got itself in a tight PR situation when it crowdsourced the naming of its new ship and “Boaty McBoatface” got the most votes to be the name for the new research vessel. Here are some lessons on brand control on the Internet.
  • A recent study suggests that “Grammar Nazis,” or people who are obsessed with correcting others’ grammar mistakes, may not be nice people after all.
  • Mobile livestreaming apps like Facebook and Periscope need a waiting room to keep people entertained while they wait for their livestreams to begin.
  • Is today’s “selfie culture” bad for our brains? Philosopher-psychoanalyst Elsa Godart discusses the impact of “egoportraits” and how there is a real danger of losing the connection and consciousness of the world around us.
  • Paleoanthropologist Genevieve von Petzinger has found markings around Europe that may point out how writing began.
  • Do you want to know how productive people send their e-mails? This article provides six ways on how to do it.
  • Gmail is now the world’s largest e-mail service. Nathan McAlone shares 17 tips and tricks that will change the way you use Gmail.
Image: “Survey Delves into Journalists’ Social Media Habits” by Marketwired Blog. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Filipinos’ electoral engagement as seen on social media

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Social media seemed to have played a distinct role in the recent Philippine national elections. The run-up to the May 9 polls was marked by high engagement as Filipinos typed with vigor and/or fury, voicing out their opinions and support for their candidates through the means of social networking sites. This led to the Philippines landing a spot in Twitter’s “Top Social Media Countries in the World.”

Meanwhile, teenagers, comprising most of the social media users’ population, have been a challenging audience for some sectors, especially those who perceive the youth as having low awareness or interest in details about history and Philippine politics. As the recent electoral period has seen, however, using social media as a catalyst can become a game changer for campaigns to consider in capturing the youth’s attention for future elections.

Here are more stories of interest:

  • Peabody Awards and Facebook team up for the launch of the Futures of Media Award, which is described as the “new prize honoring excellence and innovation in digital storytelling.”
  • Studies from Pew Research Center and Dartmouth’s Tiltfactor Lab explore how the Internet affects what and how we read.
  • The New York Times, along with Associated Press, has decided to stop capitalizing the word “internet.”
  • Garner’s Modern American Usage becomes Garner’s Modern English Usage as the new edition integrates an “inclusive approach to World English.”
  • Typography, believe it or not, can have life or death consequences, especially on road signs.
  • For writers, The Atlantic author Ian Bogost writes a review about Freewrite, a smart typewriter made for writers who don’t want distractions from the Internet.
  • Twitter recently made changes within its interface, such as making usernames, photos, and videos no longer part of the 140-character limit and providing the option to retweet one’s own tweets and replies.
  • Facebook’s “Trending Topics” feature is once again under controversy when leaked guidelines allegedly show the involvement of editors, instead of algorithms, in selecting news for said feature.
  • Jeff Jarvis, in a piece for the annual Tinius Trust report titled “Death to the Mass,” explains why “media must rebuild its business around relevance and value, not volume,” and how the Internet changed the old mass-media business model.
  • Scammers have been lurking in the Internet for their next victims, so let this be a call to protect ourselves while navigating the social networking sites safely.
  • Social media can also be a tool in saving lives as demonstrated during the tragic landslide in Aranayake, Sri Lanka last May 19.
  • Different cultures define the concept of deadlines depending on how people perceive time.
  • Our work environment can have a negative effect on our mental health, according to the Mental Resilience Survey.
  • Here is an infographic with seven ways on how to stay calm under pressure.
  • A 10-minute mind cleansing routine is always handy for a boost in clarity and creativity.
Image: “The 2016 Elections” by Angelo Lopez (AAEC). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Adapting and adopting innovations in social media

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Twitter just announced that its user growth is still in a slump despite the introduction of its Moments feature. This seems to show that in the age where everything for a social media site could change in an instant, one of the keys to surviving the social media rat race is to offer innovation whenever possible.

Users could easily come and go, so social media sites offer new content and retool features as a way to make them stay. Whether it be through big moves, such as Facebook lining up new features ranging from indexing all user’s posts, testing out emoji reactions, instant articles, to rolling out a notification card system, or via small changes, like Twitter changing its star-shaped “favorite” button to a heart-shaped “like” button, these are decisions that site owners need to make to tip the scales in their favor.

Whether it’s for the upcoming elections or for the Internet’s biggest phenomenon, social media use plays a key role in how trends develop. With social media, site owners have an opportunity to showcase their flexibility and tech-savviness and a platform to discuss society’s biggest issues. It also powers the cycle where users adapt and adopt technology.

Here are the other stories that made it to our reading list:

Image: “50 Days of AWE” by AWSC. Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Sending love to all mothers

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Last May 10, the world celebrated Mother’s Day by giving thanks to all mothers: biological or adoptive, stepmothers and mothers-in-law, stay-at-home and working moms. Google’s Doodle for the occasion showcased various forms of motherly love ranging from a swan and her cygnet, a cheetah with her cub, to a child running to her mother for a hug.

People look up to their mothers for their selfless love, dedication for their families’ well-being, and wisdom. This issue is dedicated to resilient women everywhere. Here are selected articles for the queen of the house:

  • A mom’s job is surely tough. The challenges of motherhood come with opportunities to learn unique skills. One successful entrepreneur and mother listed the reasons why moms make for a great hire.
  • Working mothers have maternity leaves. But what if fathers can have more paternity leaves to help their wives get back on their feet?
  • There are also tips for the working mom-to-be in preparing for the birth of her baby while trying to sort things out in her job.

Other posts of interest include:

  • Fresh graduates will have to step up their game to land a good job. Here’s some advice to help them settle in as they join the job hunt. Also, here’s an insider’s view on some workplace secrets.
  • E-mails are an efficient communication alternative but they are also prone to misinterpretations. Look out for these five rude e-mails that you might be sending out every day.
  • Social media interaction can get tedious and monotonous over time if what you share or what your audience see stimulate insufficient interest. You might want to consider these seven ways to keep the conversation going.
  • How much of your posts on social media show your real life? On Instagram, college freshman Madison Holleran looked like she had it all: intelligence, beauty, and even athletic prowess. Behind the photos she shared, however, was a struggle holding her back from living a happy life.
  • Here’s a critique on Filipinos’ use of the word “Gayweather” as they reacted on the outcome of the Mayweather vs. Pacquiao boxing match.
Image: “Mother” by James Goodman (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye. 

Social media as news platforms

socialmediaJournalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran, under the pen name Nellie Bly, once said “energy rightly applied and directed will accomplish anything.”

In celebration of Nellie Bly’s 151st birth anniversary last May 5, Google presented a Doodle tribute showing her milestones that left a legacy in the field of investigative journalism and in the world.

The field of journalism has changed drastically over the last two decades, particularly due to the Internet. The emergence of social media platforms will have an impact on the future of journalism and communication as the new source of news and as the vital tool for information dissemination. Examples of social media-influenced journalism in the last two weeks include:

 

  • In Philippine news, Mary Jane Veloso was granted a last-minute reprieve on her execution for the crime of drug trafficking in Indonesia. The Philippine Daily Inquirer, one of the top three newspapers in the country, however, published an article with an erroneous headline implying that Mary Jane had died. Here is a blog post reflecting on how this incident shows what is happening to journalism today.
  • The Baltimore riot has been the topic of major U.S. headlines because of the violence, the looting, and the city’s state of emergency. Here is the back story and timeline on Freddie Grey’s death, the investigation on six police officers involved, and the alleged police brutality that led to the riot.
  • Al Jazeera used their social media app unit AJ+ for real-time reporting on the Baltimore riots.

 

Here are other posts in our reading list:

Image: “Social Media” by Yoel Ben-Avraham (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

Reinventing old habits for success

 

 

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Nobel laureate Günter Grass once said, “Writers know that sometimes things are there in the drawer for decades before they finally come out and you are capable of writing about them.”

Our selection for this issue takes up some of the reasons why some of our ideas could get stuck in what Grass referred to as “the drawer.”

And whether the fear of making mistakes, being too busy with work, or wasting too much time trying to get over that writer’s block is the one preventing you from opening the drawer, remember that writing is our second nature and the slumps will always come to an end at the right time, with the right actions.

Bear in mind that every obstacle presented is an opportunity to improve one’s self. So pick yourself up, grab your pen, get thinking, and prepare to face the day ahead with these articles guiding you along the way:

  • It’s hard to write when you think of yourself as “smart.” Why not change the frame? This article suggests that you think of yourself as “fascinating” instead.
  • You’ve probably read (or heard) about a popular Mashable article on “Why Zuck and other successful men wear the same thing every day”. Attention, women: you can wear the same thing every day too!
  • Grow as a leader by asking more questions instead of answering them as told through infographics.
  • Writing at a 5th grade level may actually be good. Find out how through the F-K Scores.
  • Wasting time can boost productivity and creativity. Here are things to do the next time you feel stuck at work.

Other stories of interest:

Image: “Motivational” by rajaisa (PicHost). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly selection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.

On time management, emotional intelligence, and developing habits

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It’s the second quarter of the year. How are you doing with your goals and resolutions? Our picks for this week include a book review on how you can get yourself to develop habits that will help you with your goals, as well as readings on managing your schedule so you can leave work on time and prioritizing using psychological distance. Check out:

Other posts of interest:

Image: “time” by Sean MacEntee (Flickr). Used under a Creative Commons (CC BY 2.0) license.
Ditto is a fortnightly collection of stories on publishing, media, communications, and topics that concern editorial professionals from the most credible sources on the Web. We hope to educate young professional writers and editors about industry standards, breakthroughs, and trends, among other things. Usually, you’ll find news and commentaries in here, but from time to time, we also feature tweets, visuals, games, freebies, and other fun but useful stuff that caught our eye.